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Preconference [clear filter]
Sunday, August 16
 

8:45am

Pre-conference Bundles
Register for both Digital Forensics for Archivists: Fundamentals and Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced and save!

SAA Member $455 / $515
Employees of Member Institutions $485 / $545
Nonmember $515 / $575


Register for either Fundamentals of Project Management for ArchivistsTowards Financial Sustainability in Archivesand/or Advanced Project Management for Archivists and save!

Any two courses:
SAA Member $279 / $339
Employees of Member Institutions $309 / $369
Nonmember $339 / $399

All three courses: 
SAA Member $359 / $419
Employees of Member Institutions $389 / $449
Nonmember $419 / $479



Please call the SAA Service Center to register for bundled courses:  Toll-free within the US: 866-722-7858 or 312-606-0722.

Sunday August 16, 2015 8:45am - Tuesday August 18, 2015 5:00pm
Off site

9:00am

Archives: Principles and Practices #1608 (Day 1 of 2)
Limited Capacity seats available

Course Fees: Advance / Regular

SAA Members
: $289 / $349
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $329 / $389
Nonmembers: $379 / $429

Course Description (2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs)

Although they have much in common with librarians, records managers, and museum staff, archivists must use different practices to protect the integrity of historical records. A strong archives program puts into practice long-standing archival principles. What are those principles and how do you implement them? This workshop provides an overview of basic archival functions, including appraisal and accessioning, arrangement and description, preservation, and reference.

In this workshop you’ll:


  • Learn archives and historical records terminology and get an overview of the body of knowledge needed, ethical responsibilities, and resources for continuing professional development;

  • Discover the principles of archival organization and functions: provenance, respect de fonds, and original order;

  • Find out about core policy statements, professional standards, and best practices, and learn how to evaluate your current program and determine needed improvements;

  • Develop the knowledge base needed to make choices for balancing access to and preservation of historical records and holdings; and

  • Gain a greater understanding of the role of the archives in fulfilling the mission of the institution.



Who should attend?
Librarians, records managers, museum staff, and administrators who have responsibility for archival records but little or no archives training.

Attendance is limited to 35.


Speakers
avatar for Pam Hackbart-Dean

Pam Hackbart-Dean

Director, Special Collections Research Center, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Pam Hackbart-Dean is currently the director of the Special Collections Research Center at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. She has been a processing archivist and manager of special collections and archives for 30+ years.
avatar for Anne Ostendarp

Anne Ostendarp

Multimedia Archivist, Knights of Columbus
Anne Ostendarp is Consulting and Project Archivist. Her career in archives started in 1983 as an archives assistant. She has served as archivist in research and college library special collections settings at Dartmouth College (1992-2002), University of Connecticut (1987-1991), and... Read More →


Sunday August 16, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Van Aken Renaissance Cleveland Hotel, 24 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44113

9:00am

Digital Forensics for Archivists: Fundamentals (NEW!) #1610 [DAS] [This course is FULL]
Limited Capacity seats available

This course is now full.
Course Fees: Advance / Regular*

SAA Member $215 / $275
Employees of Member Institutions $245 / $305
Nonmember $275 / $335 

*Register for both Digital Forensics for Archivists: Fundamentals and Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced and save!

SAA Member $455 / $515
Employees of Member Institutions $485 / $545
Nonmember $515 / $575

Course Description (1 day, .75 CEUs, 1 DAS, 5 ARCs) | You must bring a laptop to participate successfully in this course.

The field of digital forensics often evokes images of prime-time television crime dramas. But what is it, and how can you put digital forensics tools and processes to use in your home institution?

Archivists are more likely than ever to be confronted with collections containing removable storage media (e.g., floppy disks, hard drives, thumb drives, memory sticks, CDs). These media provide limited accessibility, and may endanger the electronic records housed within due to obsolescence and loss over time. Caring for these records requires archivists to extract whatever useful information resides on the medium while avoiding the accidental alteration of data or metadata. 

Upon completion of this course you’ll be able to:




  • Demonstrate an understanding of the principles, tools, and technologies behind the practical field of digital forensics; 



  • Explore how digital forensics tools and techniques can apply to an archival setting; and 



  • Consider a range of digital forensics toolsand use some of them to create disk images and analyze their content for different types of information. 




In addition, you’ll explore the layers of hardware and software that allow bitstreams on digital media to be read as files, the roles and relationships of these layers, and tools and techniques for ensuring the completeness and evidential value of data.

Who should attend? Archivists, manuscript curators, librarians, and others who are responsible for acquiring or transferring collections of digital materials, particularly those that are received on removable media.

Knowledge assumed for this course: Participants are expected to have basic knowledge of archival practice, computers, and digital records management.

This course is designed specifically as a precursor to and prerequisite for the two-day Tools and Services DAS course Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced

This course, one of the Foundational Courses in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum and Certificate Program, builds on others, including Basic Electronic Records, Thinking Digital, and Standards for Digital Archives. If you intend to pursue the Certificate, you'll need to pass the examination for this course. Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.

The DAS Core Competencies addressed in this course are: 

#1: Understand the nature of records in electronic form, including the functions of various storage media, the nature of system dependence, and the effect on integrity of records over time.
#3: Formulate strategies and tactics for appraising, describing, managing, organizing, and preserving digital archives.
#6: Curate, store, and retrieve original masters and access copies of digital archives.


Attendance is limited to 25.

Sunday August 16, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Junod Learning Space Western Reserve Historical Society, 10825 East Boulevard, Cleveland OH, 44105

9:00am

Fundamentals of Project Management for Archivists (Revised!) #1607
Limited Capacity seats available

Course Fees: Advance / Regular*

SAA Members: $189 / $249
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $219 / $279
Nonmembers: $249 / $299

*
Register for either Fundamentals of Project Management for ArchivistsTowards Financial Sustainability in Archives, and/or Advanced Project Management for Archivists and save!

Any two courses:
SAA Member $279 / $339
Employees of Member Institutions $309 / $369
Nonmember $339 / $399

All three courses: 
SAA Member $359 / $419
Employees of Member Institutions $389 / $449
Nonmember $419 / $479


Course Description (1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs)

You’re involved in a variety of projects every day, from small (such as developing a new procedures manual) to large (such as digitizing a collection). But because project management methodologies aren’t automatically included in formal educationor many archival education programsyou may not have acquired the basic knowledge and tools necessary for managing successful projects. Here’s your chance!

Upon completion of this course you'll be able to: 




  • Describe the project life cycle from initiation to completion;



  • Utilize effective project management tools and techniques;



  • Evaluate project outcomes and disseminate project information; and



  • Demonstrate how positive personnel management adds to a successful project. 





Who should attend?
This is an introductory workshop that can also be taken as a refresher course on project management. Project team members who want to become more active in and achieve a better understanding of the workings of their own projects also are welcome.

Knowledge assumed for this course: A basic understanding of archives.

Attendance is limited to 35.

Speakers
avatar for Rosemary Pleva Flynn

Rosemary Pleva Flynn

Principal Librarian and Library & Information Services Team Lead, University of North Dakota
Rosemary Flynn is the Principal Librarian & Library & Information Services Team Lead, at the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota. She is an active member of SAA and currently chairs the Dictionary Working Group.


Sunday August 16, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Severance Renaissance Cleveland Hotel, 24 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44113

9:00am

Architectural Records: Managing Design and Construction Records #1609 (Day 1 of 2)
Limited Capacity seats available

Please Note: This course takes place off site.

Course Fees:
Advance / Regular

SAA Member: $289 / $349
Employees of Member Institutions: $329 / $389
Nonmember: $379 / $429


Course Description (2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs)

Architectural design and construction records are valuable sources for understanding and preserving the built and designed environment.  Because they document a complicated work process that includes numerous creators and results in voluminous mixed, oversized, often fragile materials and fugitive media, implementing the basic archival functions of appraisal, arrangement, description, preservation, and reference can present a formidable task.

In this two-day workshop, you’ll learn how to appraise, preserve, and provide access to design and construction records. On the first day we’ll cover the process of design, legal issues, appraisal, types of records, arrangement, and description, including MPLP approaches; on the second day we’ll focus on media and support identification, preservation, reformatting, electronic records, reference, and patron use. Taking into consideration the diverse requirements of different types of repositories, as well as the reality of limited space and budgets, this workshop will present best practices as well as practical solutions.

Upon completion of this workshop you’ll be able to:






  • Describe the process of design and the records created and how this knowledge affects the appraisal, arrangement, and description of this material;



  • Recognize the special legal issues created by design and construction records;



  • Identify content and intent of design and construction drawings;



  • Develop methodologies for appraisal, arrangement, and description appropriate for a range of repositories;     



  • Find specific media and supports used for design and construction drawings;



  • Assess common types of deterioration, various options for holdings maintenance, and when to refer problems to professional conservators;



  • Name options for housing design and construction drawings and identify those that may be most appropriate for your institution and budget;



  • Make informed decisions for reformatting design and construction records for access and preservation;



  • List the issues with appraising and preserving computer-aided design and BIM records; and



  • Address specialized handling, reproduction, and use needs when providing reference and access for this material.






Who should attend?
Archivists, special collections librarians, and museum curators.

Knowledge assumed for this course:
Archival practice and professional standards.

Attendance is limited to 35.


Speakers
avatar for Waverly Lowell

Waverly Lowell

Curator, University of California, Berkeley
As Curator of the Environmental Design Archives, I've developed a standard series system to facilitate processing large collections, worked with a magical method to make large slide collections readily and remotely accessible and promotes user driven digitization, and used Omeka... Read More →
avatar for Tawny Ryan Nelb

Tawny Ryan Nelb

President, Nelb Archival Consulting, Inc.
Tawny Ryan Nelb has a BA in American Studies and an MA in American History. After work for the Hoover Presidential Library and ten years with the Yale Manuscript and Archives Department, she became an independent archival consultant and historian in 1986. She has published over 30... Read More →


Sunday August 16, 2015 9:00am - Monday August 17, 2015 5:00pm
Mowry Renaissance Cleveland Hotel, 24 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44113
 
Monday, August 17
 

9:00am

Architectural Records: Managing Design and Construction Records #1609 (Day 2 of 2)
Limited Capacity seats available

Please Note: This course takes place off site.

Course Fees:
Advance / Regular

SAA Member: $289 / $349
Employees of Member Institutions: $329 / $389
Nonmember: $379 / $429


Course Description (2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs)

Architectural design and construction records are valuable sources for understanding and preserving the built and designed environment.  Because they document a complicated work process that includes numerous creators and results in voluminous mixed, oversized, often fragile materials and fugitive media, implementing the basic archival functions of appraisal, arrangement, description, preservation, and reference can present a formidable task.

In this two-day workshop, you’ll learn how to appraise, preserve, and provide access to design and construction records. On the first day we’ll cover the process of design, legal issues, appraisal, types of records, arrangement, and description, including MPLP approaches; on the second day we’ll focus on media and support identification, preservation, reformatting, electronic records, reference, and patron use. Taking into consideration the diverse requirements of different types of repositories, as well as the reality of limited space and budgets, this workshop will present best practices as well as practical solutions.

Upon completion of this workshop you’ll be able to:



  • Describe the process of design and the records created and how this knowledge affects the appraisal, arrangement, and description of this material;

  • Recognize the special legal issues created by design and construction records;

  • Identify content and intent of design and construction drawings;

  • Develop methodologies for appraisal, arrangement, and description appropriate for a range of repositories;     

  • Find specific media and supports used for design and construction drawings;

  • Assess common types of deterioration, various options for holdings maintenance, and when to refer problems to professional conservators;

  • Name options for housing design and construction drawings and identify those that may be most appropriate for your institution and budget;

  • Make informed decisions for reformatting design and construction records for access and preservation;

  • List the issues with appraising and preserving computer-aided design and BIM records; and

  • Address specialized handling, reproduction, and use needs when providing reference and access for this material.



Who should attend?
Archivists, special collections librarians, and museum curators.

Knowledge assumed for this course:
Archival practice and professional standards.

Attendance is limited to 35.


Speakers
avatar for Waverly Lowell

Waverly Lowell

Curator, University of California, Berkeley
As Curator of the Environmental Design Archives, I've developed a standard series system to facilitate processing large collections, worked with a magical method to make large slide collections readily and remotely accessible and promotes user driven digitization, and used Omeka... Read More →
avatar for Tawny Ryan Nelb

Tawny Ryan Nelb

President, Nelb Archival Consulting, Inc.
Tawny Ryan Nelb has a BA in American Studies and an MA in American History. After work for the Hoover Presidential Library and ten years with the Yale Manuscript and Archives Department, she became an independent archival consultant and historian in 1986. She has published over 30... Read More →


Monday August 17, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Mowry Renaissance Cleveland Hotel, 24 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44113

9:00am

Archives: Principles and Practices #1608 (Day 2 of 2)
Limited Capacity seats available

Course Fees: Advance / Regular

SAA Members
: $289 / $349
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $329 / $389
Nonmembers: $379 / $429

Course Description (2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs)

Although they have much in common with librarians, records managers, and museum staff, archivists must use different practices to protect the integrity of historical records. A strong archives program puts into practice long-standing archival principles. What are those principles and how do you implement them? This workshop provides an overview of basic archival functions, including appraisal and accessioning, arrangement and description, preservation, and reference.

In this workshop you’ll:


  • Learn archives and historical records terminology and get an overview of the body of knowledge needed, ethical responsibilities, and resources for continuing professional development;

  • Discover the principles of archival organization and functions: provenance, respect de fonds, and original order;

  • Find out about core policy statements, professional standards, and best practices, and learn how to evaluate your current program and determine needed improvements;

  • Develop the knowledge base needed to make choices for balancing access to and preservation of historical records and holdings; and

  • Gain a greater understanding of the role of the archives in fulfilling the mission of the institution.



Who should attend?
Librarians, records managers, museum staff, and administrators who have responsibility for archival records but little or no archives training.

Attendance is limited to 35.


Speakers
avatar for Pam Hackbart-Dean

Pam Hackbart-Dean

Director, Special Collections Research Center, Southern Illinois University Carbondale
Pam Hackbart-Dean is currently the director of the Special Collections Research Center at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. She has been a processing archivist and manager of special collections and archives for 30+ years.
avatar for Anne Ostendarp

Anne Ostendarp

Multimedia Archivist, Knights of Columbus
Anne Ostendarp is Consulting and Project Archivist. Her career in archives started in 1983 as an archives assistant. She has served as archivist in research and college library special collections settings at Dartmouth College (1992-2002), University of Connecticut (1987-1991), and... Read More →


Monday August 17, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Van Aken Renaissance Cleveland Hotel, 24 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44113

9:00am

Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced (Revised!) #1611 (Day 1 of 2) [DAS] [This course is FULL]
Limited Capacity seats available

This course is now full.
Course Fees: Advance / Regular*

SAA Members: $325 / $385
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $365 / $425
Nonmembers: $425/ $485

*Register for both Digital Forensics for Archivists: Fundamentals and Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced and save!

SAA Member $455 / $515
Employees of Member Institutions $485 / $545
Nonmember $515 / $575

Course Description (2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 1 DAS, 10 ARCs) | You must bring a laptop to participate successfully in this course.

Have you learned some of the basics of digital forensics (e.g., creating disk images, generating hashes of files, opening files in hex editors), but now want to know what you should do next? In this course, you’ll learn how to apply a variety of digital forensics methods and tools in order to recover, preserve, and ultimately provide access to born-digital records. We’ll explore a variety of forensic artifacts, generate reports about the contents of disks, extract metadata, and identify patterns that may require filtering or redaction. Strong emphasis will be placed on the use of open-source tools to process, characterize, and provide access to born-digital data.

Upon completion of this course you’ll be able to:





  • Install and operate the BitCurator environment as a virtual machine within VirtualBox;



  • Explain and recognize the different types of metadata that are stored in common filesystems;



  • Identify file types based on magic numbers (file signatures);



  • Determine potential hardware options for acquisition of data from various types of storage media;



  • Apply several common Linux commands at the command line and compose basic regular expressions;



  • Run forensics tools from the command line and manipulate the output;



  • Evaluate disk image format options based on the needs and priorities of your institution and collections;



  • Generate BitCurator reports and use bulk_extractor to identify potentially sensitive data;



  • Extract and interpret EXIF metadata from within digital photographs and other files;



  • Capture and analyze Windows Registry artifacts using RegRipper;



  • Determine essential points in your institution’s workflows at which it will be beneficial to incorporate forensics tools and methods;



  • Make and justify decisions of professional ethics that emerge when caring for born-digital records; and



  • Recognize available technical strategies for providing access to data acquired from disk images.




Who should attend?
This class is intended for archivists, manuscript curators, librarians, and others who are responsible for acquiring or transferring collections of digital materials, particularly those that are received on removable media.

Knowledge assumed for this course:
Participants are expected to have taken Digital Forensics: Fundamentals and know how to create disk images, generate and verify cryptographic hashes of files, and examine the contents of a file in a hex editor. You should also understand the reasons for creating disk images and using write blockers, as well as the role and purpose of filesystems, file headers, file signatures, and the Windows Registry. We also assume that you know basic archival practice and have intermediate knowledge of computers and digital records management.

This course builds on others in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum, including Basic Electronic Records, Thinking Digital, Accessioning and Ingest, and Beginner’s Guide to Metadata.

This course is one of the Tools and Services Courses in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum and Certificate Program. If you intend to pursue the Certificate, you'll need to pass the examination for this course. Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.

The
 DAS Core Competencies addressed in this course are:
#1. Understand the nature of records in electronic form, including the functions of various storage media, the nature of system dependence, and the effect on integrity of records over time.
#3. Formulate strategies and tactics for appraising, describing, managing, organizing, and preserving digital archives.
#4. Integrate technologies, tools, software, and media within existing functions for appraising, capturing, preserving, and providing access to digital collections.
#6. Curate, store, and retrieve original masters and access copies of digital archives.

Attendance is limited to 35
.

Speakers
avatar for Cal Lee

Cal Lee

University of North Carolina, United States of America


Monday August 17, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Junod Learning Space Western Reserve Historical Society, 10825 East Boulevard, Cleveland OH, 44105

9:00am

Encoded Archival Description [EAD 3] (Updated!) #1616 (Day 1 of 2)
Limited Capacity seats available

Course Fees: Advance / Regular

SAA Members: $325 / $385
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $365 / $425
Nonmembers: $425 / $485

Course Description (2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs)

Here’s your chance to receive the instruction and hands-on practice you need to deliver your finding aids on the Web in a standardized format. Get acquainted with Extensible Markup Language (XML) and practice with authoring software to create an XML version of a finding aid. This 2-day workshop covers the most up-to-date version of EAD!

Upon completion of this workshop you'll be able to:


  • Identify the fundamentals of Extensible Markup Language (XML);

  • Recognize the structure of EAD (the SAA-endorsed standard for archival finding aids);

  • Mark up a complete finding aid;

  • Explore implementation strategies; and

  • Practice encoding your own finding aid using EAD.



Who should attend?
Archivists and others who are charged with exploring and/or implementing EAD at their institutions or who want to enhance their rsums.

Knowledge assumed for this course:
Arrangement and description practice and familiarity with finding aids.

Attendance is limited to 25
.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Fox

Michael Fox

Minnesota Historical Society, Director Emeritus
Michael Fox is Director Emeritus of the Minnesota Historical Society. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin School of Library and Information Studies, he worked for fourteen years at the Wisconsin Historical Society. He took a position with the Minnesota Historical Society in... Read More →
avatar for Kris Kiesling

Kris Kiesling

Director of Archives and Special Collections, Elmer L. Andersen Library, University of Minnesota
Kris Kiesling became Director of Archives Special Collections at the University of Minnesota in 2005. Prior to that appointment, she was Associate Director for Technical and Digital Services at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, at the University of Texas at Austin, and... Read More →


Monday August 17, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Case Western Reserve University Kelvin Smith Library, 11055 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106

9:00am

Managing Audiovisual Digitization Projects (NEW!) #1615
Limited Capacity seats available

Course Fees: Advance / Regular

SAA Members
: $189 / $249
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $219 / $279
Nonmembers: $249 / $299

Course Description (1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs)

Audiovisual media are found in most archival repositories and present numerous preservation, access, and technical challenges. Recent studies show that between degradation and equipment obsolescence, most media will be unable to be preserved in another 10-15 years. Through lecture, writing exercises, and hands-on activities, participants will learn how to plan and implement the digitization and preservation of audiovisual materials.

Upon completion of this workshop you’ll be able to:





  • Implement a survey of holdings for audiovisual media and prioritize for digitization;



  • Recognize a/v digitization standards and identify resources to follow standards as they develop;



  • Create and implement a plan for digitization projects; and



  • Identify digitization funding sources.






Who should attend?
Archivists, librarians, and museum professionals.

Knowledge assumed for this course:
A basic understanding of physical audio and video formats and general knowledge of the outcomes of digitization projects for any format. Knowledge of basic archival and preservation theory and practice.

Attendance is limited to 35.


Speakers
avatar for George Blood

George Blood

Owner, George Blood Audio/Video/Film
George Blood has worked in classical music production since receiving his bachelor's degree in Music Theory from the University of Chicago in 1983. While recording live concerts (from student recitals to opera and major symphony orchestras) since 1982, he documented over 4,000 live... Read More →
avatar for Robin Pike

Robin Pike

Manager, Digital Conversion and Media Reformatting, University of Maryland Libraries, United States of America
avatar for Joshua Ranger

Joshua Ranger

Senior Consultant, AVPS
Joshua (M.) Ranger is a Senior Consultant with AVPreserve where he leads Collection Assessment and Inventory projects, specializing in data analysis and communication in support of planning, advocacy, collection management, and resource development. Recent projects have focused on... Read More →


Monday August 17, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Digital Public Library, Room 341 Cleveland Public Library, 325 Superior Ave., N.E., Cleveland, OH 44114

9:00am

PREMIS Tutorial (Updated!) #1613 [DAS]
Limited Capacity seats available

Course Fees: Advance / Regular

SAA Members: $205 / $265
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $235 / $295
Nonmembers: $265 / $325

Course Description (1 day, .75 CEUs, 1 DAS, 5 ARCs) | You must bring a laptop to participate successfully in this course.

The PREMIS Data Dictionary for Preservation Metadata provides a key piece of infrastructure for digital preservation activities and plays a vital role in enabling the effective management, discovery, and re-usability of digital information. Preservation metadata provide provenance information, document preservation activity, identify technical features, and aid in verifying the authenticity of digital objects. PREMIS is a core set of metadata elements recommended for use in all preservation repositories, regardless of the type of materials archived, the type of institution, and the preservation strategies employed.

You’ll get an introduction to PREMIS and its data model, a walk-through of the Data Dictionary, examples of PREMIS metadata in real situations, and implementation considerationsparticularly using PREMIS in XML with the Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS). You’ll also explore strategies for using controlled vocabularies with PREMIS semantic units. There will be examples of PREMIS usage and time for questions and answers.

Upon completion of this course you’ll be able to:





  • Define the need for preservation metadata for long-term preservation of digital objects;



  • Describe the PREMIS Data Model and how it applies to management of digital objects;



  • Identify the semantic units in the PREMIS Data Dictionary and how they apply to different categories of digital assets;



  • Consider issues that an institution might encounter in its collection and management of preservation metadata; and



  • Highlight a number of use cases, which will assist you in planning your use of preservation metadata.



Who should attend?
Practitioners who are involved in implementing and managing preservation systems in various kinds of repositories, including archives, government agencies, libraries, museums, and other types of cultural heritage institutions.

Knowledge assumed for this course: Participants are expected to have some involvement in and knowledge of digital preservation as well as some familiarity with XML and METS.

This course is one of the Tools and Services Courses of the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum and Certificate Program. If you intend to pursue the Certificate, you’ll need to pass the examination for this course. Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.

The 
DAS Core Competencies addressed in this course are:

#1: Understand the nature of records in electronic form, including the functions of various storage media, the nature of system dependence, and the effect on integrity of records over time.
#2: Communicate and define requirements, roles, and responsibilities related to digital archives to a variety of partners and audiences.
#3: Formulate strategies and tactics for appraising, describing, managing, organizing, and preserving digital archives.
#4: Integrate technologies, tools, software, and media within existing functions for appraising, capturing, preserving, and providing access to digital collections.
#5: Plan for the integration of new tools or successive generations of emerging technologies, software, and media.
#6: Curate, store, and retrieve original masters and access copies of digital archives.

Attendance is limited to 35.


Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Guenther

Rebecca Guenther

Consultant, Rebecca Guenther Consulting
I spent 35 years in national libraries, primarily working on library technology standards related to digital libraries. Most of my professional life was spent at the Library of Congress developing national and international standards related to metadata. I live in New York and consult... Read More →


Monday August 17, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Bush Renaissance Cleveland Hotel, 24 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44113

9:00am

Privacy and Confidentiality Issues in Digital Archives #1614 [DAS] [This course is FULL]
Limited Capacity seats available

This course is now full.

Course Fees:
Advance / Regular

SAA Members: $205 / $265
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $235 / $295
Nonmembers: $265 / $325

Course Description (1 day, .75 CEUs, 1 DAS, 5 ARCs)

This course covers privacy and confidentiality legal issues specific to archives of digital material. You'll examine the intersection of (and tension between) privacy/confidentiality, free speech, and freedom to research/write and focus on how electronic records and the digital realm have altered the scene. You’ll look at privacy and confidentiality issues in the context of third-party rights, donors, such special situations as medical and education records, national security legislation, and the overriding impact of the digital world.  Through case studies, you’ll examine specific situations pertinent to the work of archivists. 

Although participants should be familiar with basic concepts of privacy and confidentiality, a brief review of the development of these concepts will be provided to ground the discussion.  The focus of the day will be on how to think through and identify options for resolving the most commonly encountered privacy and confidentiality legal issues around electronic records.

Upon completion of this course you'll be able to:





  • Recognize and discuss common legal issues relating to privacy and confidentiality issues in general, and for digital archives in particular;



  • Interpret these issues from an archivist’s perspective;



  • Realize when ingested records pose possible privacy and confidentiality legal issues;



  • Identify, employ, analyze, and compare the ramifications of a variety of legal steps that you might take to prevent or address one of the legal issues; and



  • Communicate and work more effectively with your legal counsel and administration.






Who should attend?
Archivists and others who need to address privacy and confidentiality legal issues relating to the digital archives of their institutions.

Knowledge assumed for this course:
You should have intermediate to advanced knowledge of archival practices and basic knowledge of general privacy and confidentiality concerns and their effect on archives, including an understanding of how archivists typically address such concerns.

This course, one of the Tactical and Strategic Courses in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum and Certificate Program, builds on others, including Basic Electronic Records . If you intend to pursue the Certificate, you'll need to pass the examination for this course. Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.

The 
DAS Core Competencies addressed in this course are:
#2: Communicate and define requirements, roles, and responsibilities related to digital archives to a variety of partners and audiences.

Attendance is limited to 35.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Briston

Heather Briston

University Archivist, University of California Los Angeles
Heather Briston is the University Archivist for UCLA. Previously, she was the Head of Public Services for UCLA Library Special Collections, the Corrigan Solari University Historian and Archivist at the University of Oregon from 2001-2011, and also an archivist at the University of... Read More →


Monday August 17, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Stokes Building, Room 218 Cleveland Public Library, 525 Superior Ave., N.E., Cleveland, OH 44114
 
Tuesday, August 18
 

9:00am

Advanced Project Management for Archivists (NEW!) #1618
Limited Capacity seats available

Course Fees: Advance / Regular*

SAA Members: $189 / $249
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $219 / $279
Nonmembers: $249 / $299

*Register for either Fundamentals of Project Management for ArchivistsTowards Financial Sustainability in Archivesand/or Advanced Project Management for Archivists and save!

Any two courses:
SAA Member $279 / $339
Employees of Member Institutions $309 / $369
Nonmember $339 / $399

All three courses: 
SAA Member $359 / $419
Employees of Member Institutions $389 / $449
Nonmember $419 / $479



Course Description (1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs)

Building on the basic project management skills you learned in Fundamentals of Project Management for Archivists, this workshop delves more deeply into skills you’ll need to manage more complex projects or multiple projects at the same time. Topics include working with partners, risk management, change management, and quality management. You’ll also learn how to develop business case documentation that helps you get buy in from sponsors and stakeholders, kick off your project, and keep it on track. Finally, you’ll learn how to evaluate the project management process and project outcomes to develop a project management methodology that works for you and your institution.

Upon completion of this workshop you'll be able to: 




  • Describe the skills necessary to manage more complex projects;



  • Apply and share advanced project planning techniques;



  • Develop business case documentation for your project; and



  • Develop a project management methodology that you can use over and over again.





Who should attend? This is an advanced project management workshop for those who have taken Fundamentals of Project Management for Archivists or who already have project management experience.

Knowledge assumed for this course: Basic project management skills. 

Attendance is limited to 35.

Speakers
avatar for Rosemary Pleva Flynn

Rosemary Pleva Flynn

Principal Librarian and Library & Information Services Team Lead, University of North Dakota
Rosemary Flynn is the Principal Librarian & Library & Information Services Team Lead, at the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota. She is an active member of SAA and currently chairs the Dictionary Working Group.


Tuesday August 18, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Van Aken Renaissance Cleveland Hotel, 24 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44113

9:00am

Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS) [Updated!] #1619
Limited Capacity seats available

Course Fees: Advance / Regular

SAA Members
: $189 / $249
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $219 / $279
Nonmembers: $249 / $299

Course Description (1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs)

Get an in-depth introduction to the key principles, concepts, and elements of Describing Archives: A Content Standard, the most recent revision of the U.S. standard for describing archival materials and their creators. Learn how to implement and incorporate DACS into workflows for accessioning, arrangement, and description through discussions and hands-on work with a variety of exercises designed to help you identify required elements and create a variety of descriptions. This workshop focuses on application of DACS rules and concepts, which participants can integrate into local repository processes and descriptive outputs.


Upon completion of this course you'll be able to: 



  • Articulate what DACS is (and isn’t), and how its basic principles relate to archival theory and practice;







  • Distinguish between minimal and value-added descriptions for archival materials and creators;







  • Apply DACS rules to identify and formulate required elements of archival description; and







  • Learn how DACS can be applied to the various activities of the archival enterprise.



Who should attend? Anyone whose work includes accessioning, arranging, and describing, or who supervises employees who do that work.

You must bring a print copy of the DACS 2nd Edition OR a laptop and/or tablet to access the publication via the SAA Standards Portal, as your instructor will ask you to follow along or look at parts of this text. 

A print version is available for purchase in the SAA Bookstore, and you’ll have the option to purchase the print version during the online registration process.

Knowledge assumed for this course:  Fundamentals of arrangement and description of archival records.  

Attendance is limited to 35. 

Speakers
GD

Gordon Daines

Supervisor of Reference Services and Department Chair, Brigham Young University Library
J. Gordon Daines III is the Supervisor of Reference Services and Department Chair in the L. Tom Perry Special Collections at Brigham Young University. He holds degrees in history from Brigham Young University (BA) and the University of Chicago (MA) and a certificate in archives and... Read More →


Tuesday August 18, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Digital Public Library, Room 341 Cleveland Public Library, 325 Superior Ave., N.E., Cleveland, OH 44114

9:00am

Developing Specifications and RFPs #1617 [DAS]
Limited Capacity seats available

Course Fees: Advance / Regular

SAA Members: $205 / $265
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $235 / $295
Nonmembers: $265 / $325

Course Description(1 day, .75 CEUs; 1 DAS, 5 ARCs)

The development of a fully functional digital archives requires an integrated recordkeeping system that identifies, describes, schedules, and destroys or retains your organization’s born-digital records.  Successful recordkeeping systems reflect business processes and applicable federal and state statutes while identifying records with permanent value to be archived.  The ideal recordkeeping system interfaces with a digital repository used to curate electronic records and support a wide range of archival processes, including preservation and access.  Before purchasing or building a recordkeeping system, you need a clear list of system requirements specific to your organization.  From these specifications, you can build a good request for proposal , select a system or vendor, and successfully implement your recordkeeping system.

Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:
 



  • Identify and define systems requirements for an electronic recordkeeping system and/or digital repository;



  • Develop and distribute a request for information, request for proposal, or request for quotation;



  • Evaluate and select a recordkeeping system; and



  • Implement the system.



Who should attend?
Archivists, records managers, IT professionals, and administrators who need to define system requirements for an electronic recordkeeping system and/or digital repository and then develop a request for information, proposal, and/or quotation.

Knowledge assumed for this course:
Participants must have a working knowledge of archival and records management processes.  Knowledge of digital archives and libraries is helpful, but not required.

This course complements other Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum courses, such as Thinking Digital; Digital Curation: Fundamentals for Success; Digital Archives and Libraries; Archival Collections Management Systems; and Digital Curation Planning and Sustainable Futures.

This course, one of the Tactical and Strategic Courses in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum and Certificate Program, builds on others, including Basic Electronic Records. If you intend to pursue the Certificate, you'll need to pass the examination for this course. Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.

The
 DAS Core Competencies addressed in this course are:
#3: Formulate strategies and tactics for appraising, describing, managing, organizing, and preserving digital archives.
#4: Integrate technologies, tools, software, and media within existing functions for appraising, capturing, preserving, and providing access to digital collections.

Attendance is limited to 35.

Speakers
avatar for Cynthia Ghering

Cynthia Ghering

Director of University Archives and Historical Collections, Michigan State University


Tuesday August 18, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
George Bush Renaissance Cleveland Hotel, 24 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44113

9:00am

Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced (Revised!) #1611 (Day 2 of 2) [DAS] [This course is FULL]
Limited Capacity seats available

This course is now full.
Course Fees: Advance / Regular*

SAA Members: $325 / $385
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $365 / $425
Nonmembers: $425/ $485

Course Description (2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 1 DAS, 10 ARCs) | You must bring a laptop to participate successfully in this course.

Have you learned some of the basics of digital forensics (e.g., creating disk images, generating hashes of files, opening files in hex editors), but now want to know what you should do next? In this course, you’ll learn how to apply a variety of digital forensics methods and tools in order to recover, preserve, and ultimately provide access to born-digital records. We’ll explore a variety of forensic artifacts, generate reports about the contents of disks, extract metadata, and identify patterns that may require filtering or redaction. Strong emphasis will be placed on the use of open-source tools to process, characterize, and provide access to born-digital data.

Upon completion of this course you’ll be able to:






  • Install and operate the BitCurator environment as a virtual machine within VirtualBox;



  • Explain and recognize the different types of metadata that are stored in common filesystems;



  • Identify file types based on magic numbers (file signatures);



  • Determine potential hardware options for acquisition of data from various types of storage media;



  • Apply several common Linux commands at the command line and compose basic regular expressions;



  • Run forensics tools from the command line and manipulate the output;



  • Evaluate disk image format options based on the needs and priorities of your institution and collections;



  • Generate BitCurator reports and use bulk_extractor to identify potentially sensitive data;



  • Extract and interpret EXIF metadata from within digital photographs and other files;



  • Capture and analyze Windows Registry artifacts using RegRipper;



  • Determine essential points in your institution’s workflows at which it will be beneficial to incorporate forensics tools and methods;



  • Make and justify decisions of professional ethics that emerge when caring for born-digital records; and



  • Recognize available technical strategies for providing access to data acquired from disk images.






Who should attend?
This class is intended for archivists, manuscript curators, librarians, and others who are responsible for acquiring or transferring collections of digital materials, particularly those that are received on removable media.

Knowledge assumed for this course:
Participants are expected to have taken Digital Forensics: Fundamentals and know how to create disk images, generate and verify cryptographic hashes of files, and examine the contents of a file in a hex editor. You should also understand the reasons for creating disk images and using write blockers, as well as the role and purpose of filesystems, file headers, file signatures, and the Windows Registry. We also assume that you know basic archival practice and have intermediate knowledge of computers and digital records management.

This course builds on others in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum, including Basic Electronic Records, Thinking Digital, Accessioning and Ingest, and Beginner’s Guide to Metadata.

This course is one of the Tools and Services Courses in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum and Certificate Program. If you intend to pursue the Certificate, you'll need to pass the examination for this course. Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.

The
 DAS Core Competencies addressed in this course are:
#1. Understand the nature of records in electronic form, including the functions of various storage media, the nature of system dependence, and the effect on integrity of records over time.
#3. Formulate strategies and tactics for appraising, describing, managing, organizing, and preserving digital archives.
#4. Integrate technologies, tools, software, and media within existing functions for appraising, capturing, preserving, and providing access to digital collections.
#6. Curate, store, and retrieve original masters and access copies of digital archives.

Attendance is limited to 35
.
 
*Register for both Digital Forensics for Archivists: Fundamentals and Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced and save!

SAA Member $455 / $515
Employees of Member Institutions $485 / $545
Nonmember $515 / $575

During registration/check out: You must select both courses in the bundle and the corresponding fee (in the drop down menu) to secure your seat and discount. Selecting only one course in a bundle will not confirm your seat in both courses. (i.e., Select both Digital Forensics for Archivists: Fundamentals and Digitial Forensics for Archivists: Advance to be registered in both and receive the discounted registration rate.)

Speakers
avatar for Cal Lee

Cal Lee

University of North Carolina, United States of America


Tuesday August 18, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Western Reserve Historical Society 10825 East Boulevard, Cleveland OH, 44105

9:00am

Encoded Archival Description [EAD 3] (Updated!) #1616 (Day 2 of 2)
Limited Capacity seats available

Course Fees: Advance / Regular

SAA Members: $325 / $385
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $365 / $425
Nonmembers: $425 / $485

Course Description (2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 10 ARCs)

Here’s your chance to receive the instruction and hands-on practice you need to deliver your finding aids on the Web in a standardized format. Get acquainted with Extensible Markup Language (XML) and practice with authoring software to create an XML version of a finding aid. This 2-day workshop covers the most up-to-date version of EAD!

Upon completion of this workshop you'll be able to:


  • Identify the fundamentals of Extensible Markup Language (XML);

  • Recognize the structure of EAD (the SAA-endorsed standard for archival finding aids);

  • Mark up a complete finding aid;

  • Explore implementation strategies; and

  • Practice encoding your own finding aid using EAD.



Who should attend?
Archivists and others who are charged with exploring and/or implementing EAD at their institutions or who want to enhance their rsums.

Knowledge assumed for this course:
Arrangement and description practice and familiarity with finding aids.

Attendance is limited to 25
.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Fox

Michael Fox

Minnesota Historical Society, Director Emeritus
Michael Fox is Director Emeritus of the Minnesota Historical Society. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin School of Library and Information Studies, he worked for fourteen years at the Wisconsin Historical Society. He took a position with the Minnesota Historical Society in... Read More →
avatar for Kris Kiesling

Kris Kiesling

Director of Archives and Special Collections, Elmer L. Andersen Library, University of Minnesota
Kris Kiesling became Director of Archives Special Collections at the University of Minnesota in 2005. Prior to that appointment, she was Associate Director for Technical and Digital Services at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, at the University of Texas at Austin, and... Read More →


Tuesday August 18, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Case Western Reserve University Kelvin Smith Library, 11055 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106

9:00am

Rights and Permissions: Policies for Reproduction and Reuse of Archival Holdings #1620
Limited Capacity seats available

Course Fees: Advance / Regular

SAA Members: $189 / $249
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $219 / $279
Nonmembers: $249 / $299

Course Description (1 day, .75 CEUs, 5 ARCs)

Making our holdings available for use is fundamental to the archival mission, yet many archives attempt to control further uses in various ways. When is it appropriate for an archives to limit reuse in order to protect its interests?

In this one-day workshop you’ll explore the issues involved in developing an institutional policy on reproduction and reuse of holdings so that you can permit responsible reuse that is consistent with the law, ethical practice, your institution’s financial needs, and its core mission.

Upon completion of this workshop, you’ll be able to:




  • Articulate reasons for controlling reuse;



  • Distinguish between copyright issues and other reasons for controlling reuse;



  • Learn about findings of empirical research into controls on reuse;



  • Understand the issues to be considered in developing an institutional policy on reproduction and reuse; and



  • Revise institutional policies as appropriate for particular situations.



Who should attend?
 Archivists (including managers and administrators) and staff who are responsible for working on and overseeing reproduction and permissions.

Knowledge assumed for this course:
A general understanding of copyright as it applies to archival material, such as is offered in SAA’s Copyright: The Archivist and the Law or equivalent.

Attendance is limited to 35.


Speakers
JD

Jean Dryden

University of Maryland
Jean Dryden's expertise in archives and the impact of law on archival practice has been developed over many years of experience as an archivist in the government, education, and non-profit sectors in Canada. Her primary research interest is copyright; her doctoral dissertation (University... Read More →


Tuesday August 18, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Stokes Building, Room 218 Cleveland Public Library, 525 Superior Ave., N.E., Cleveland, OH 44114