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Preconference [clear filter]
Sunday, August 16
 

8:45am

Pre-conference Bundles
Register for both Digital Forensics for Archivists: Fundamentals and Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced and save!

SAA Member $455 / $515
Employees of Member Institutions $485 / $545
Nonmember $515 / $575


Register for either Fundamentals of Project Management for ArchivistsTowards Financial Sustainability in Archivesand/or Advanced Project Management for Archivists and save!

Any two courses:
SAA Member $279 / $339
Employees of Member Institutions $309 / $369
Nonmember $339 / $399

All three courses: 
SAA Member $359 / $419
Employees of Member Institutions $389 / $449
Nonmember $419 / $479



Please call the SAA Service Center to register for bundled courses:  Toll-free within the US: 866-722-7858 or 312-606-0722.

Sunday August 16, 2015 8:45am - Tuesday August 18, 2015 5:00pm
Off site

9:00am

Digital Forensics for Archivists: Fundamentals (NEW!) #1610 [DAS] [This course is FULL]
Limited Capacity seats available

This course is now full.
Course Fees: Advance / Regular*

SAA Member $215 / $275
Employees of Member Institutions $245 / $305
Nonmember $275 / $335 

*Register for both Digital Forensics for Archivists: Fundamentals and Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced and save!

SAA Member $455 / $515
Employees of Member Institutions $485 / $545
Nonmember $515 / $575

Course Description (1 day, .75 CEUs, 1 DAS, 5 ARCs) | You must bring a laptop to participate successfully in this course.

The field of digital forensics often evokes images of prime-time television crime dramas. But what is it, and how can you put digital forensics tools and processes to use in your home institution?

Archivists are more likely than ever to be confronted with collections containing removable storage media (e.g., floppy disks, hard drives, thumb drives, memory sticks, CDs). These media provide limited accessibility, and may endanger the electronic records housed within due to obsolescence and loss over time. Caring for these records requires archivists to extract whatever useful information resides on the medium while avoiding the accidental alteration of data or metadata. 

Upon completion of this course you’ll be able to:




  • Demonstrate an understanding of the principles, tools, and technologies behind the practical field of digital forensics; 



  • Explore how digital forensics tools and techniques can apply to an archival setting; and 



  • Consider a range of digital forensics toolsand use some of them to create disk images and analyze their content for different types of information. 




In addition, you’ll explore the layers of hardware and software that allow bitstreams on digital media to be read as files, the roles and relationships of these layers, and tools and techniques for ensuring the completeness and evidential value of data.

Who should attend? Archivists, manuscript curators, librarians, and others who are responsible for acquiring or transferring collections of digital materials, particularly those that are received on removable media.

Knowledge assumed for this course: Participants are expected to have basic knowledge of archival practice, computers, and digital records management.

This course is designed specifically as a precursor to and prerequisite for the two-day Tools and Services DAS course Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced

This course, one of the Foundational Courses in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum and Certificate Program, builds on others, including Basic Electronic Records, Thinking Digital, and Standards for Digital Archives. If you intend to pursue the Certificate, you'll need to pass the examination for this course. Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.

The DAS Core Competencies addressed in this course are: 

#1: Understand the nature of records in electronic form, including the functions of various storage media, the nature of system dependence, and the effect on integrity of records over time.
#3: Formulate strategies and tactics for appraising, describing, managing, organizing, and preserving digital archives.
#6: Curate, store, and retrieve original masters and access copies of digital archives.


Attendance is limited to 25.

Sunday August 16, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Junod Learning Space Western Reserve Historical Society, 10825 East Boulevard, Cleveland OH, 44105
 
Monday, August 17
 

9:00am

Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced (Revised!) #1611 (Day 1 of 2) [DAS] [This course is FULL]
Limited Capacity seats available

This course is now full.
Course Fees: Advance / Regular*

SAA Members: $325 / $385
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $365 / $425
Nonmembers: $425/ $485

*Register for both Digital Forensics for Archivists: Fundamentals and Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced and save!

SAA Member $455 / $515
Employees of Member Institutions $485 / $545
Nonmember $515 / $575

Course Description (2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 1 DAS, 10 ARCs) | You must bring a laptop to participate successfully in this course.

Have you learned some of the basics of digital forensics (e.g., creating disk images, generating hashes of files, opening files in hex editors), but now want to know what you should do next? In this course, you’ll learn how to apply a variety of digital forensics methods and tools in order to recover, preserve, and ultimately provide access to born-digital records. We’ll explore a variety of forensic artifacts, generate reports about the contents of disks, extract metadata, and identify patterns that may require filtering or redaction. Strong emphasis will be placed on the use of open-source tools to process, characterize, and provide access to born-digital data.

Upon completion of this course you’ll be able to:





  • Install and operate the BitCurator environment as a virtual machine within VirtualBox;



  • Explain and recognize the different types of metadata that are stored in common filesystems;



  • Identify file types based on magic numbers (file signatures);



  • Determine potential hardware options for acquisition of data from various types of storage media;



  • Apply several common Linux commands at the command line and compose basic regular expressions;



  • Run forensics tools from the command line and manipulate the output;



  • Evaluate disk image format options based on the needs and priorities of your institution and collections;



  • Generate BitCurator reports and use bulk_extractor to identify potentially sensitive data;



  • Extract and interpret EXIF metadata from within digital photographs and other files;



  • Capture and analyze Windows Registry artifacts using RegRipper;



  • Determine essential points in your institution’s workflows at which it will be beneficial to incorporate forensics tools and methods;



  • Make and justify decisions of professional ethics that emerge when caring for born-digital records; and



  • Recognize available technical strategies for providing access to data acquired from disk images.




Who should attend?
This class is intended for archivists, manuscript curators, librarians, and others who are responsible for acquiring or transferring collections of digital materials, particularly those that are received on removable media.

Knowledge assumed for this course:
Participants are expected to have taken Digital Forensics: Fundamentals and know how to create disk images, generate and verify cryptographic hashes of files, and examine the contents of a file in a hex editor. You should also understand the reasons for creating disk images and using write blockers, as well as the role and purpose of filesystems, file headers, file signatures, and the Windows Registry. We also assume that you know basic archival practice and have intermediate knowledge of computers and digital records management.

This course builds on others in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum, including Basic Electronic Records, Thinking Digital, Accessioning and Ingest, and Beginner’s Guide to Metadata.

This course is one of the Tools and Services Courses in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum and Certificate Program. If you intend to pursue the Certificate, you'll need to pass the examination for this course. Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.

The
 DAS Core Competencies addressed in this course are:
#1. Understand the nature of records in electronic form, including the functions of various storage media, the nature of system dependence, and the effect on integrity of records over time.
#3. Formulate strategies and tactics for appraising, describing, managing, organizing, and preserving digital archives.
#4. Integrate technologies, tools, software, and media within existing functions for appraising, capturing, preserving, and providing access to digital collections.
#6. Curate, store, and retrieve original masters and access copies of digital archives.

Attendance is limited to 35
.

Speakers
avatar for Cal Lee

Cal Lee

University of North Carolina, United States of America


Monday August 17, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Junod Learning Space Western Reserve Historical Society, 10825 East Boulevard, Cleveland OH, 44105

9:00am

PREMIS Tutorial (Updated!) #1613 [DAS]
Limited Capacity seats available

Course Fees: Advance / Regular

SAA Members: $205 / $265
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $235 / $295
Nonmembers: $265 / $325

Course Description (1 day, .75 CEUs, 1 DAS, 5 ARCs) | You must bring a laptop to participate successfully in this course.

The PREMIS Data Dictionary for Preservation Metadata provides a key piece of infrastructure for digital preservation activities and plays a vital role in enabling the effective management, discovery, and re-usability of digital information. Preservation metadata provide provenance information, document preservation activity, identify technical features, and aid in verifying the authenticity of digital objects. PREMIS is a core set of metadata elements recommended for use in all preservation repositories, regardless of the type of materials archived, the type of institution, and the preservation strategies employed.

You’ll get an introduction to PREMIS and its data model, a walk-through of the Data Dictionary, examples of PREMIS metadata in real situations, and implementation considerationsparticularly using PREMIS in XML with the Metadata Encoding and Transmission Standard (METS). You’ll also explore strategies for using controlled vocabularies with PREMIS semantic units. There will be examples of PREMIS usage and time for questions and answers.

Upon completion of this course you’ll be able to:





  • Define the need for preservation metadata for long-term preservation of digital objects;



  • Describe the PREMIS Data Model and how it applies to management of digital objects;



  • Identify the semantic units in the PREMIS Data Dictionary and how they apply to different categories of digital assets;



  • Consider issues that an institution might encounter in its collection and management of preservation metadata; and



  • Highlight a number of use cases, which will assist you in planning your use of preservation metadata.



Who should attend?
Practitioners who are involved in implementing and managing preservation systems in various kinds of repositories, including archives, government agencies, libraries, museums, and other types of cultural heritage institutions.

Knowledge assumed for this course: Participants are expected to have some involvement in and knowledge of digital preservation as well as some familiarity with XML and METS.

This course is one of the Tools and Services Courses of the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum and Certificate Program. If you intend to pursue the Certificate, you’ll need to pass the examination for this course. Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.

The 
DAS Core Competencies addressed in this course are:

#1: Understand the nature of records in electronic form, including the functions of various storage media, the nature of system dependence, and the effect on integrity of records over time.
#2: Communicate and define requirements, roles, and responsibilities related to digital archives to a variety of partners and audiences.
#3: Formulate strategies and tactics for appraising, describing, managing, organizing, and preserving digital archives.
#4: Integrate technologies, tools, software, and media within existing functions for appraising, capturing, preserving, and providing access to digital collections.
#5: Plan for the integration of new tools or successive generations of emerging technologies, software, and media.
#6: Curate, store, and retrieve original masters and access copies of digital archives.

Attendance is limited to 35.


Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Guenther

Rebecca Guenther

Consultant, Rebecca Guenther Consulting
I spent 35 years in national libraries, primarily working on library technology standards related to digital libraries. Most of my professional life was spent at the Library of Congress developing national and international standards related to metadata. I live in New York and consult... Read More →


Monday August 17, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Bush Renaissance Cleveland Hotel, 24 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44113

9:00am

Privacy and Confidentiality Issues in Digital Archives #1614 [DAS] [This course is FULL]
Limited Capacity seats available

This course is now full.

Course Fees:
Advance / Regular

SAA Members: $205 / $265
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $235 / $295
Nonmembers: $265 / $325

Course Description (1 day, .75 CEUs, 1 DAS, 5 ARCs)

This course covers privacy and confidentiality legal issues specific to archives of digital material. You'll examine the intersection of (and tension between) privacy/confidentiality, free speech, and freedom to research/write and focus on how electronic records and the digital realm have altered the scene. You’ll look at privacy and confidentiality issues in the context of third-party rights, donors, such special situations as medical and education records, national security legislation, and the overriding impact of the digital world.  Through case studies, you’ll examine specific situations pertinent to the work of archivists. 

Although participants should be familiar with basic concepts of privacy and confidentiality, a brief review of the development of these concepts will be provided to ground the discussion.  The focus of the day will be on how to think through and identify options for resolving the most commonly encountered privacy and confidentiality legal issues around electronic records.

Upon completion of this course you'll be able to:





  • Recognize and discuss common legal issues relating to privacy and confidentiality issues in general, and for digital archives in particular;



  • Interpret these issues from an archivist’s perspective;



  • Realize when ingested records pose possible privacy and confidentiality legal issues;



  • Identify, employ, analyze, and compare the ramifications of a variety of legal steps that you might take to prevent or address one of the legal issues; and



  • Communicate and work more effectively with your legal counsel and administration.






Who should attend?
Archivists and others who need to address privacy and confidentiality legal issues relating to the digital archives of their institutions.

Knowledge assumed for this course:
You should have intermediate to advanced knowledge of archival practices and basic knowledge of general privacy and confidentiality concerns and their effect on archives, including an understanding of how archivists typically address such concerns.

This course, one of the Tactical and Strategic Courses in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum and Certificate Program, builds on others, including Basic Electronic Records . If you intend to pursue the Certificate, you'll need to pass the examination for this course. Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.

The 
DAS Core Competencies addressed in this course are:
#2: Communicate and define requirements, roles, and responsibilities related to digital archives to a variety of partners and audiences.

Attendance is limited to 35.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Briston

Heather Briston

University Archivist, University of California Los Angeles
Heather Briston is the University Archivist for UCLA. Previously, she was the Head of Public Services for UCLA Library Special Collections, the Corrigan Solari University Historian and Archivist at the University of Oregon from 2001-2011, and also an archivist at the University of... Read More →


Monday August 17, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Stokes Building, Room 218 Cleveland Public Library, 525 Superior Ave., N.E., Cleveland, OH 44114
 
Tuesday, August 18
 

9:00am

Developing Specifications and RFPs #1617 [DAS]
Limited Capacity seats available

Course Fees: Advance / Regular

SAA Members: $205 / $265
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $235 / $295
Nonmembers: $265 / $325

Course Description(1 day, .75 CEUs; 1 DAS, 5 ARCs)

The development of a fully functional digital archives requires an integrated recordkeeping system that identifies, describes, schedules, and destroys or retains your organization’s born-digital records.  Successful recordkeeping systems reflect business processes and applicable federal and state statutes while identifying records with permanent value to be archived.  The ideal recordkeeping system interfaces with a digital repository used to curate electronic records and support a wide range of archival processes, including preservation and access.  Before purchasing or building a recordkeeping system, you need a clear list of system requirements specific to your organization.  From these specifications, you can build a good request for proposal , select a system or vendor, and successfully implement your recordkeeping system.

Upon completion of this course, you'll be able to:
 



  • Identify and define systems requirements for an electronic recordkeeping system and/or digital repository;



  • Develop and distribute a request for information, request for proposal, or request for quotation;



  • Evaluate and select a recordkeeping system; and



  • Implement the system.



Who should attend?
Archivists, records managers, IT professionals, and administrators who need to define system requirements for an electronic recordkeeping system and/or digital repository and then develop a request for information, proposal, and/or quotation.

Knowledge assumed for this course:
Participants must have a working knowledge of archival and records management processes.  Knowledge of digital archives and libraries is helpful, but not required.

This course complements other Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum courses, such as Thinking Digital; Digital Curation: Fundamentals for Success; Digital Archives and Libraries; Archival Collections Management Systems; and Digital Curation Planning and Sustainable Futures.

This course, one of the Tactical and Strategic Courses in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum and Certificate Program, builds on others, including Basic Electronic Records. If you intend to pursue the Certificate, you'll need to pass the examination for this course. Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.

The
 DAS Core Competencies addressed in this course are:
#3: Formulate strategies and tactics for appraising, describing, managing, organizing, and preserving digital archives.
#4: Integrate technologies, tools, software, and media within existing functions for appraising, capturing, preserving, and providing access to digital collections.

Attendance is limited to 35.

Speakers
avatar for Cynthia Ghering

Cynthia Ghering

Director of University Archives and Historical Collections, Michigan State University


Tuesday August 18, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
George Bush Renaissance Cleveland Hotel, 24 Public Square, Cleveland, OH 44113

9:00am

Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced (Revised!) #1611 (Day 2 of 2) [DAS] [This course is FULL]
Limited Capacity seats available

This course is now full.
Course Fees: Advance / Regular*

SAA Members: $325 / $385
Employees of SAA Member Institutions: $365 / $425
Nonmembers: $425/ $485

Course Description (2 days, 1.5 CEUs, 1 DAS, 10 ARCs) | You must bring a laptop to participate successfully in this course.

Have you learned some of the basics of digital forensics (e.g., creating disk images, generating hashes of files, opening files in hex editors), but now want to know what you should do next? In this course, you’ll learn how to apply a variety of digital forensics methods and tools in order to recover, preserve, and ultimately provide access to born-digital records. We’ll explore a variety of forensic artifacts, generate reports about the contents of disks, extract metadata, and identify patterns that may require filtering or redaction. Strong emphasis will be placed on the use of open-source tools to process, characterize, and provide access to born-digital data.

Upon completion of this course you’ll be able to:






  • Install and operate the BitCurator environment as a virtual machine within VirtualBox;



  • Explain and recognize the different types of metadata that are stored in common filesystems;



  • Identify file types based on magic numbers (file signatures);



  • Determine potential hardware options for acquisition of data from various types of storage media;



  • Apply several common Linux commands at the command line and compose basic regular expressions;



  • Run forensics tools from the command line and manipulate the output;



  • Evaluate disk image format options based on the needs and priorities of your institution and collections;



  • Generate BitCurator reports and use bulk_extractor to identify potentially sensitive data;



  • Extract and interpret EXIF metadata from within digital photographs and other files;



  • Capture and analyze Windows Registry artifacts using RegRipper;



  • Determine essential points in your institution’s workflows at which it will be beneficial to incorporate forensics tools and methods;



  • Make and justify decisions of professional ethics that emerge when caring for born-digital records; and



  • Recognize available technical strategies for providing access to data acquired from disk images.






Who should attend?
This class is intended for archivists, manuscript curators, librarians, and others who are responsible for acquiring or transferring collections of digital materials, particularly those that are received on removable media.

Knowledge assumed for this course:
Participants are expected to have taken Digital Forensics: Fundamentals and know how to create disk images, generate and verify cryptographic hashes of files, and examine the contents of a file in a hex editor. You should also understand the reasons for creating disk images and using write blockers, as well as the role and purpose of filesystems, file headers, file signatures, and the Windows Registry. We also assume that you know basic archival practice and have intermediate knowledge of computers and digital records management.

This course builds on others in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum, including Basic Electronic Records, Thinking Digital, Accessioning and Ingest, and Beginner’s Guide to Metadata.

This course is one of the Tools and Services Courses in the Digital Archives Specialist (DAS) Curriculum and Certificate Program. If you intend to pursue the Certificate, you'll need to pass the examination for this course. Please follow Option 1 to access exam information.

The
 DAS Core Competencies addressed in this course are:
#1. Understand the nature of records in electronic form, including the functions of various storage media, the nature of system dependence, and the effect on integrity of records over time.
#3. Formulate strategies and tactics for appraising, describing, managing, organizing, and preserving digital archives.
#4. Integrate technologies, tools, software, and media within existing functions for appraising, capturing, preserving, and providing access to digital collections.
#6. Curate, store, and retrieve original masters and access copies of digital archives.

Attendance is limited to 35
.
 
*Register for both Digital Forensics for Archivists: Fundamentals and Digital Forensics for Archivists: Advanced and save!

SAA Member $455 / $515
Employees of Member Institutions $485 / $545
Nonmember $515 / $575

During registration/check out: You must select both courses in the bundle and the corresponding fee (in the drop down menu) to secure your seat and discount. Selecting only one course in a bundle will not confirm your seat in both courses. (i.e., Select both Digital Forensics for Archivists: Fundamentals and Digitial Forensics for Archivists: Advance to be registered in both and receive the discounted registration rate.)

Speakers
avatar for Cal Lee

Cal Lee

University of North Carolina, United States of America


Tuesday August 18, 2015 9:00am - 5:00pm
Western Reserve Historical Society 10825 East Boulevard, Cleveland OH, 44105
 
Wednesday, August 19
 

8:30am

SAA Digital Archives Specialist [DAS] Certificate Comprehensive Exam
Wednesday August 19, 2015 8:30am - 12:30pm
Room 26B Cleveland Convention Center, 300 Lakeside Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44114